HSRC and partners to embark on joint HIV and TB pilot study

CATEGORY: Social Aspects of Public Health
DATE: 13 August 2019

The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) and its partners will be conducting a joint TB and HIV pilot study in KwaZulu-Natal between 26 August and 20 September.

The purpose of the pilot study is to determine the feasibility of conducting a larger joint Tuberculosis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (TB/HIV) survey.  The project will:

  • determine survey uptake of combined HIV and TB testing
  • assess data quality of collected interview and biomarker measures
  • estimate the  costs of a (scaled-up) joint population-based TB/ HIV impact assessment (PHIA) survey
  • document operational lessons learned to inform scale up of future joint TB-HIV surveys.

The survey will be taking place in two communities (called clusters for the purpose of the study) in Kwa-Zulu-Natal, namely Marburg and The Ridge (Umgayi). 

There will be two phases to the project:

  1. Household phase, where all eligible individuals up to 500 adults (≥ 15 years as per the South African TB prevalence survey), plus their accompanying children (300 children < 15 years per cluster) will be asked to participate by answering a questionnaire. In each cluster, all households will be selected for inclusion into the pilot survey.  The people who will be invited to participate will be people of all ages who have slept in that respective household for at least five nights of the previous two weeks.
  2. Hub phase, where all participants who are potentially at risk of having TB will be asked to participate by having various health checks including a TB and HIV test.  Where participants need to be referred to treatment and support, they will be linked to a local clinic.

The survey will be anonymous, meaning that all personal identifiers will be delinked once the survey has been completed. The study aims to reach a total of 1,600 people in Kwazulu-Natal.

Field workers will visit specific homes to invite members of households within the selected areas, to participate in the survey. They will also provide more information about the exact venue, date and times that the survey will be in your area.

This pilot survey is very important to South Africa, as it will give an indication if HSRC and its partners can implement a larger survey in order to support efforts to find the best methods to fight TB and HIV. Community members are requested to welcome field workers, identified by their branded bibs and name tags, into their homes, and to support them in this process.

For further information call:

Team Leader: Ms Tsatsi Mkhombo: 081 848 9985

Project Director: Mr Shandir Ramlagan: 082 355 2379

Project PI: Dr Sizulu Moyo: smoyo@hsrc.ac.za

For media enquiries or to set up interviews, please contact Adziliwi Nematandani (HSRC), 082 765 9191, email: anematandani@hsrc.ac.za.

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Notes to the editor

About the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC)

The HSRC was established in 1968 as South Africa’s statutory research agency and has grown to become the largest dedicated research institute in the social sciences and humanities on the African continent, doing cutting-edge public research in areas that are crucial to development.

Our mandate is to inform the effective formulation and monitoring of government policy; to evaluate policy implementation; to stimulate public debate through the effective dissemination of research-based data and fact-based research results; to foster research collaboration; and to help build research capacity and infrastructure for the human sciences.

The Council conducts large-scale, policy-relevant, social-scientific research for public sector users, non-governmental organisations and international development agencies. Research activities and structures are closely aligned with South Africa’s national development priorities.