Research Use and Impact Assessment

S&T, infrastructure, capital and skills could lead to material benefits also for women

The Gender Summit in Africa is going to stimulate meaningful conversations that will ensure that the research agenda is strengthened and also it will help us to reflect on how science, technology, infrastructure, capital and skills could lead to material benefits also for women. The Gender Summit-Africa will be able to take a fresh look at gender issues in knowledge making based on science.

Three weeks left! Submit your abstract for WSS Forum 2015

11 February 2015  | Latest News  | Research Use and Impact Assessment

We would like to take this opportunity to remind you that there are only 3 weeks left to submit your abstracts for the upcoming WSS Forum 2015.

Issue-Based Politics vs Personality-Based Politics: A Tale of Two Nations

There is a difference between a political environment characterised mostly by issue-based politics and one characterised by personality-based politics. However, the two cannot be entirely separated. In cases where the Big Man syndrome has kicked in, we see that the personality of the person in charge overrides the issues at hand. In South Africa, although issues have largely defined politics, there has also been a great focus on personality-based politics.

Assata: The FBI's most wanted woman (new book)

In 2013, Assata Shakur – founding member of the Black Liberation Army, former Black Panther and godmother of Tupac Shakur – became the first ever woman to make the FBI’s most wanted terrorist list.

Register for GS5 Africa

Registration is now open for the Gender Summit Africa to be held in Cape Town later this year.

Poverty alleviation and economic empowerment through research and innovation

Africa has been used as a site and source of many research pursuits. Currently we are the world’s fastest growing continent with an exceptional opportunity for economic growth and prosperity, mainly due to our natural and human resources. African researchers have produced proven evidence that Africa has the capacity to produce research that has a social impact, employing varied scientific disciplines. The Gender Summit Africa (GSA) is set to be one of the activities that we embark upon to stimulate meaningful conversations that will ensure that Africa’s research agenda is strengthened as we reflect on how our science, technology, infrastructure, capital and skills could be used to realize the continent’s full potential for the benefit of its entire people.

Top journalist tackles the skeletons in SA's cupboard

 

“I’d rather have a country established on a national truth than on a national myth.”

Famed veteran journalist ­turned­ author, Michael Schmidt, pulled no punches at the launch of his book, Drinking with Ghosts: The Aftermath of Apartheid’s Dirty War (BestRed), in Johannesburg.

Schmidt's novel, A Reporter's Notebook, ­which respected journalist Max du Preez calls “the best he's read”­, dives into a time of anxious revolution and rebellion - a period which Schmidt claims to be “airbrushed”, by selectively nostalgic capitalist opportunists.

“People keep talking about the peaceful transition, but I remember sitting by mass graves every weekend, so I don’t remember the peaceful transition...neither do millions of South Africans who actually went through it,” explains Schmidt.

HSRC concludes relationship with the Swiss Government

A science symposium hosted by the Ambassador of Switzerland, Christian Meuwly, concluded an agreement between the HSRC, the Swiss Embassy, the University of Basel and other social partners to commit to the ideals of the Swiss–South African Joint Research Programme (SSAJRP).

Nigeria's economic boom: A positive outcome for intra-Africa trade

This policy brief seeks to reflect on the co-operative and competitive dynamics characterising the bilateral relations between the two countries, and to examine any possible resultant political and economic dividends that may promote the development of both countries and the continent as a whole. It concludes that the economic boom in Nigeria should be viewed within the context of the achievement of NEPAD’s objectives, and goes on to recommend actions for improving bilateral trade between the two countries.

Electronic data-collection methods are feasible, acceptable, accurate and usable

A new policy brief from the HSRC, titled Evidence for the feasibility, acceptability, accuracy and use of electronic data-collection methods for health in KwaZulu-Natal states that there is evidence that electronic data-collection methods are feasible, acceptable, accurate and usable. After reviewing the literature and weighing up the evidence, recommendations are made for district and provincial-level health management.

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