Malls in Zambia: racialised retail expansion and South African foreign investors in Zambia

SOURCE: African Sociological Review
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2008
TITLE AUTHOR(S): D.Miller, E.Nel, G.Hampwaye
KEYWORDS: INVESTMENT, RETAIL TRADE, ZAMBIA
DEPARTMENT: Democracy, Governance and Service Delivery (DGSD)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 5709
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/4987

If you would like to obtain a copy of this Research Output, please contact Hanlie Baudin at researchoutputs@hsrc.ac.za.

Abstract

What does this new era of retailing mean for Zambians and the region more generally? In this article we try to show that, while South African capital's expansion is a powerful, regional manoeuvre that dispossesses as it accumulates; it is by no means rolling over the torpid remnants of a post-independence battlefield. Class contestations shape and reshape the South African economic expansion in retail. Local entrepreneurs, investors, workers and farmers resist the imperial impetus in South Africa's post-apartheid regional expansion. Workers, farmers, local entrepreneurs and even local investors, in the form of minority share-holders, have contested the South African-led retail expansion. Regional and continental contestations around retail and other expansions abound, ranging from Nigerian local farmers who want to burn down Shoprite stores, to Egyptian retailers who eschew a company that will not play Arabic prayers during Friday prayer time, to the Shoprite workers who claimed equal status with their South African counterparts.