Coexistence as a strategy for opposition parties in challenging the African National Congress' one-party dominance

SOURCE: Politikon
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2019
TITLE AUTHOR(S): I.Khambule, A.Nomdo, B.Siswana, G.Fokou
KEYWORDS: AFRICAN NATIONAL CONGRESS (ANC), CORRUPTION, POLITICAL PARTIES, POST APARTHEID SOUTH AFRICA
DEPARTMENT: Developmental, Capable and Ethical State (DCES)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 11072
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/15031

Download this report

If you would like to obtain a copy of this Research Output, please contact Hanlie Baudin at researchoutputs@hsrc.ac.za.

Abstract

Post-apartheid democratic South Africa experienced the pitfalls of one-party dominance when the country's fifth democratically elected parliament (2014-2019) faced growing corruption, state capture, undermining of parliamentary oversight and the abuse of political power and state institutions. These events threatened the country's constitutional democracy and its principles of an accountable government as the ruling party undermined parliamentary oversight structures through majoritarianism to evade accountability by the Legislature and Executive. This led to the growing coexistence and cooperation of opposition parties (despite their ideological differences) in parliamentary oversight as a means of challenging the African National Congress (ANC) one-party dominance. This process resulted in the establishment of formal and informal coalitions for governing key cities such as Johannesburg, Tshwane and Nelson Mandela Bay. Against this backdrop, and building on a case study of these three metropolitan municipalities, this paper analyses the coexistence of the opposition parties in parliamentary oversight and in the governance of key cities as a means of challenging the ANCs one-party dominance. The analysis delineates the prospects and challenges of using coexistence as a strategy for challenging the ANCs one party-dominance post the 2019 general election.