Correlates of perceived HIV-related stigma among HIV-positive pregnant women in rural Mpumalanga province, South Africa

SOURCE: Journal of Psychology in Africa
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2019
TITLE AUTHOR(S): S.Ramlagan, S.Sifunda, K.Peltzer, J.Jean, R.A.C.Ruiter
KEYWORDS: HIV-RELATED STIGMA, HIV/AIDS, MPUMALANGU, PREGNANCY, RURAL COMMUNITIES, WOMEN
DEPARTMENT: Human and Social Capabilities (HSC)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 11174
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/15095

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Abstract

The study investigated correlates of perceived HIV-related stigma among 673 HIV-positive women from rural Mpumalanga province, South Africa (mean age 28 years old, SD = 5 .73 years) . The women completed measures of HIV-related stigma experience and related personal factors . Following multivariable logistic regression, results showed that lack of male involvement during the ante-natal visits was significantly associated with all four perceived HIV-related stigma factors . Lower income, intimate partner violence (IPV), lower education, and experienced HIV-related stigma were associated with a combination of the four components of perceived HIV-related stigma . From these findings, we conclude that higher levels of education, income, and partner involvement are protective factors against perceived HIV-related stigma, at multiple layers . Improving on adult education and income generating activities can help in reducing HIV-related stigma . Male partner involvement in their partners pregnancy, the initiation of support groups for both women and men, as well as community-based IPV prevention interventions may help to reduce perceived HIV-related stigma among women living with HIV.