"My stutter has put me on the outside": young South African Muslim men who stutter talk about masculinities and religion

SOURCE: Journal of Disability & Religion
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2021
TITLE AUTHOR(S): D.H.Isaacs, L.Swartz, Y.Toefy
KEYWORDS: DISABLED PERSONS, ISLAM, MASCULINITY, SOCIAL INCLUSION, SPEECH IMPAIRMENTS
DEPARTMENT: Human and Social Capabilities (HSC)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 11903
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/15944
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11910/15944

Download this report

If you would like to obtain a copy of this Research Output, please contact Hanlie Baudin at researchoutputs@hsrc.ac.za.

Abstract

Presently, limited studies have explored how disabled Muslim men construct their masculinities. The present article examines how five young adult Muslim men in the Western Cape, who stutter, talk about their masculinities. A series of semi-interviews were conducted with these men. These semi-structured interviews were analyzed according to Edley's guide to discourse analysis. The findings showed that Islam played an instrumental role in men's discourses of masculinities. At the same time, participants indicated experiencing disablism as men who stutter, which resulted in them either resisting or reformulating dominant forms of masculinities. Implications for future research is discussed.