Depression among pregnant rural South African women undergoing HIV testing

SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2006
TITLE AUTHOR(S): T.J.Rochat, L.M.Richter, H.A.Doll, N.PButhelezi, A.Tomkins, A.Stein
KEYWORDS: HIV-ANTIBODY TESTING, HIV/AIDS, PREGNANCY, RURAL COMMUNITIES, WOMEN
DEPARTMENT: Human and Social Development (HSD)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 3819

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Abstract

Rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in southern Africa are high, with up to 45% of pregnant women being HIV-positive. Depression is associated with lowered adherence to antiretroviral medication and poor use of antenatal care. It frequently persists into the postnatal period, raising the risk of adverse child outcomes. Because little is known about the rates of depression among women undergoing HIV testing in prevention of mother-to-child transmission programs (PMTCT), we undertook this prevalence study. A secondary aim was assessment of perceptions among these women about adverse consequences of an HIV diagnosis, and whether these perceptions were related to depression status.