Responsible alcoholic beverages sales and services training intervention in Cape Town: a pilot study

SOURCE: Journal of Psychology in Africa
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2006
TITLE AUTHOR(S): K.Peltzer, S.Ramlagan, L.Gliksman
KEYWORDS: ADOLESCENT BOYS, CAPE TOWN, DRINKING AND DRIVING
DEPARTMENT: Social Aspects of Public Health (SAPH)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 4120

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to pilot a responsible beverage service intervention in order to reduce alcohol-impaired road use. The sample included 20 shebeens including 10 licensed and 10 unlicensed establishments chosen from a list of alcohol serving establishments in Gugulethu, Cape Town. The study examined whether changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour of servers as well as BAC levels of patrons occurred as a result of receiving server intervention training. Results indicate that the training programme was effective in changing serving practices consistent with the techniques and strategies emphasized in the training. However, the breathalyser results for baseline and follow-up, respectively, in the intervention and control group did not show differences among patrons. It is recommended that mandatory server training be introduced in South Africa for licensed establishments and develop an incentive system to encourage voluntary use of server training for unlicensed establishments.