Women coping with AIDS in Africa: contributions of a contextually grounded research methodology

SOURCE: Psychology, Health & Medicine
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2006
TITLE AUTHOR(S): R.Brandt, A.Dawes, R.Bray
KEYWORDS: AFRICA, HIV/AIDS, PSYCHOLOGICAL PROBLEMS, WOMEN
DEPARTMENT: Human and Social Development (HSD)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 4192

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Abstract

The primary objective of this report is to describe a contextually grounded approach to the investigation of coping and psychological functioning in AIDS-sick mothers. Five AIDS-sick women on antiretroviral therapy who had at least one child under 6 years of age living in their households were interviewed. Among the issues that emerged was the complexity of the women's psychological functioning, the fact that they made strategic decisions about disclosure aimed at protecting important social support networks, and that their well-being was dynamically influenced by factors in the home and community. The study provides evidence for the value of a contextual approach when investigating the psychological functioning of HIV positive mothers living in poor high-HIV prevalence communities in developing countries.