HIV/AIDS knowledge, risk perception, stigma and support among staff in tertiary institutions in the Eastern Cape, South Africa

SOURCE: African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance (AJPHERD)
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2006
TITLE AUTHOR(S): N.Phaswana-Mafuya, K.Peltzer
KEYWORDS: EASTERN CAPE PROVINCE, HIV/AIDS, HIV/AIDS PREVALENCE, RISK PERCEPTION, TERTIARY INSTITUTIONS
DEPARTMENT: Human and Social Capabilities (HSC)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 4385
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/6266
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11910/6266

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Abstract

A questionnaire-based descriptive study was conducted with a proportionate sample of 872 academic and support staff in eight randomly selected ETDP SETA member tertiary institutions in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. The aim of the study was to examine HIV/AIDS knowledge, risk behaviour, risk perception, stigma and support. The sample included 390 (44.7%) men and 482 (55.3%) women, with a mean age of 40 years (SD=11.3). The majority were black (68.7%), married/co-habiting (59%), in low/middle class (90.7%), skilled/semi-skilled (86%), had high school/tertiary education (92.5). A significantly higher proportion of females had more HIV/AIDS knowledge and a genital discharge during past 12 months compared to their male counterparts. More males (significantly high) had more than one sex partner in past 12 month and were afraid to infect other people with HIV/AIDS compared to their female counterparts. Only 25.6% had used condom at last sex, though 50% had access to condoms in their workplaces. Participants indicated there is a stigma attached to HIV/AIDS at their workplace (28.5%) and in their communities (42%). Low levels of receiving and offering support in taking care of orphans were found. Key words: HIV/AIDS, tertiary institutions, Eastern Cape, South Africa. Europe (UNAIDS, 2004). The HIV/AIDS epidemic is viewed as one of the most serious public health problems in South Africa that the country has never experienced (Department of Health, 2003a).