Injury and lifestyle factors among South African grade 8 learners in the Limpopo province

SOURCE: African Safety Promotion: A Journal of Injury and Violence Prevention
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2006
TITLE AUTHOR(S): K.Peltzer
KEYWORDS: GRADE 8, INJURY SURVEILLANCE, LIFESTYLE INTERVENTION PROGRAMMES, LIMPOPO PROVINCE, SAFETY PROMOTION
DEPARTMENT: Social Aspects of Public Health (SAPH)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 4396

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between injuries that required medical attention and lifestyle factors among 884 grade 8 learners chosen at random from four urban schools in the Limpopo Province, South Africa. Results indicated an injury incidence among 52% among boys and 33% among girls in the 12 months prior to the survey. For boys and girls injury was most often sustained at a sporting facility (39%). Most school children, with more girls (52%) than boys (37%), sustained sports-related injuries during training or playing. Twelve percent of the sample sustained an injury as a result of being accidentally struck hit or cut by an object (12%). Risk for an injury was associated with being a boys having had psychosomatic symptoms and being Black. Among boys drunkenness, the experience of bullying, and unhappiness were found to be predictors of injuries. Among girls, frequent participation in exercise and poor-assessed health were independent predictors of injury risk. These results indicate the need for an integrated approach to injury etiology and safety promotion.