Experiences of prevention of mother to child transmission services by HIV+ mothers in the Eastern Cape of South Africa

SOURCE: African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance (AJPHERD)
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2008
TITLE AUTHOR(S): N.Phaswana-Mafuya, D.Kayongo
KEYWORDS: EASTERN CAPE PROVINCE, HIV/AIDS, PREVENTION OF MOTHER TO CHILD TRANSMISSION (PMTCT) PROGRAMME
DEPARTMENT: Social Aspects of Public Health (SAPH)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 5420

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Abstract

This paper reports experiences of the Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) programme by Human Immuno Deficiency Virus (HIV+) mothers in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. A focus group study was carried out among a convenient sample of 109 HIV+ mothers who were on the PMTCT programme in four health facilities offering the programme. Ten focus group interviews were conducted with these women by trained moderators. Generally, participants had a good basic knowledge of HIV and Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) during pregnancy and a good understanding of the PMTCT programme, how it works, why it is necessary and its different components. While participants acknowledged that they received Antenatal Care (ANC), delivery, Post Natal Care (PNC) and infant care services as well as quality information on the PMTCT programme, they felt that the quality of the programme and ability to comply with required feeding practices were compromised by various factors. These factors included improper conduct of some nurses, technical care sometimes not given (e.g. not examined), inadequate supplies (Nevaripine (NVP)/formula not available), poor health care organization, and inaccessible health care facilities with limited space as well as too long waiting time. In terms of support groups for People Living With HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), participants indicated that support groups were beneficial to them spiritually, socially, emotionally and psychologically. The information emanating from this study should be considered when identifying best practices for expanding and providing PMTCT services.