Condom use in the year following a sexually transmitted disease clinic visit

SOURCE: International Journal of STD & AIDS
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2009
TITLE AUTHOR(S): T.A.Peterman, L.H.Tian, L.Warner, C.L.Satterwhite, C.A.Metcalf, K.C.Malotte, S.M.Paul, J.M.Douglas, Respect -2 Study Group
KEYWORDS: CONDOM USE, HEALTH, HIV/AIDS, SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR, SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS
DEPARTMENT: Social Aspects of Public Health (SAPH)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 5611

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Abstract

Consistent condom use can prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs), but few studies have measured how the prevalence of consistent use changes over time. We measured the prevalence and correlates of consistent condom use over the course of a year. We did a secondary analysis of data from an HIV prevention trial in three sexually transmitted disease clinics. We assessed condom use during four three-month intervals for subjects and across their partnerships using unconditional logistic regression. Condom use was also assessed for subjects during all three-month intervals combined. The 2125 subjects reported on 5364 three-month intervals including 7249 partnership intervals. Condoms were always used by 24.1% of subjects and 33.2% of partnerships during a three-month interval. Over the year, 82% used condoms at least once but only 5.1% always used condoms. Always use of condom was more likely for subjects who had sex only once (66.5%) compared with .30 times (6.4%); one-time partnerships (64.1%) compared with main partnerships (22.2%); and in new partnerships (44.0%) compared with partnerships that were not new (24.5%). Although consistent condom use may prevent STIs, condoms were rarely used consistently during the year of follow-up.