Behavioral changes associated with testing HIV-positive among sexually transmitted infection clinic patients in Cape Town, South Africa

SOURCE: American Journal of Public Health
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2010
TITLE AUTHOR(S): S.C.Kalichman, D.Cain, L.C.Simbayi
KEYWORDS: CAPE TOWN, HEALTH SERVICES, HIV/AIDS, HIV/AIDS PREVENTION, SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS
DEPARTMENT: HIV/AIDS, STIs and TB (HAST)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 6481

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Abstract

Objectives. We sought to examine behavioral risks and behavior changes associated with testing HIV-positive among sexually transmitted infection (STI) patients, in order to inform HIV- and STI-prevention interventions. Methods. We performed a cohort study of 29 STI patients who seroconverted from HIV-negative to HIV-positive during 1 year of observation and 77 STI patients who persistently tested HIV-negative. Computerized behavioral interviews were collected at baseline and at 1 year, and STI clinic charts were abstracted over the same 1-year period. Results. The STI patients who reported genital bleeding during sexual activity at baseline were significantly more likely to test HIV-positive. Reductions in number of sexual partners and rates of unprotected intercourse occurred for all STI clinic patients regardless of whether they tested HIV-positive. Conclusions. Although risk reductions occurred, 5% of HIV-negative STI clinic patients subsequently tested HIV-positive over 1 year. Behavioral risk reduction interventions are urgently needed for male and female STI clinic patients.