Nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and coping related to HIV and AIDS in a rural hospital in South Africa

SOURCE: Studies on Ethno-medicine
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2011
TITLE AUTHOR(S): M.V.Mulaudzi, S.Pengpid, K.Peltzer
KEYWORDS: HIV/AIDS, HOSPITAL CARE, NURSING, RURAL COMMUNITIES
DEPARTMENT: Human and Social Capabilities (HSC)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 6840
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/3778
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11910/3778

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and coping related to HIV and AIDS in a rural hospital in South Africa. A randomly selected sample of 222 nurses was asked to respond to a self-administered questionnaire. Results indicate that the majority (83.8%) of the sample had a medium level of HIV knowledge and had a positive attitude towards caring of HIV/AIDS patients (75.8%), while a minority had negative attitudes toward caring of patients with HIV/AIDS. Regarding coping, 71.2% of the nurses had a medium level of coping in caring for patients with HIV/AIDS. Attitudes towards caring of HIV/AIDS patients was significantly associated with coping (r =.31, p< .05). Female nurses displayed a more positive attitude towards caring of HIV/AIDS patients than male nurses (t=1.89, p<.05). Nurses who had more than 10 years working experience had a significantly more positive attitude (t=2.16, p < .05) and coping ability (t=2.35, p<.05) than nurses who had less than 10 years of working experience. In conclusion, nurses had insufficient knowledge about HIV/AIDS, one in four nurses had negative attitude and one in five nurses had low coping ability towards caring of HIV/AIDS patients. Therefore, in-services training to update on HIV/AIDS knowledge to modify attitudes towards caring of HIV/AIDS patients should be implemented.