Does the importance of parent and peer relationships for adolescents' life satisfaction vary across cultures?

SOURCE: Journal of Early Adolescence
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2011
TITLE AUTHOR(S): B.Schwarz, B.Mayer, G.Trommsdorff, A.Ben-Arieh, M.Friedlmeier, K.Lubiewska, R.Mishra, K.Peltzer
KEYWORDS: CROSS-CULTURAL ASSESSMENT, CULTURAL DIVERSITY, PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP, RELATIONSHIPS, VALUES IN SOCIETY
DEPARTMENT: Social Aspects of Public Health (SAPH)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 6984

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Abstract

This study investigated whether the associations between (a) the quality of the parent-child relationship and peer acceptance and (b) early adolescents' life satisfaction differed depending on the importance of family values in the respective culture. As part of the Value of Children Study, data from a subsample of N = 1,034 adolescents (58% female, M age = 13.62 years, SD = 0.60 years) from 11 cultures was analyzed. Multilevel analyses revealed a positive relation between parental admiration and adolescents' life satisfaction independent of cultural membership. Further, the higher the importance of family values in a culture, the weaker was the positive effect of peer acceptance on adolescents' life satisfaction. The results highlight the universal importance of parental warmth and support in adolescence and underline the effect of culturally shared family values on the role of peer acceptance for adolescent development.