Social vulnerability and HIV testing among South African men who have sex with men

SOURCE: International Journal of STD & AIDS
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2011
TITLE AUTHOR(S): J.Knox, T.Sandfort, H.Yi, V.Reddy, S.Maimane
KEYWORDS: HIV TESTING AND COUNSELLING (HTC), HIV/AIDS, HOMOSEXUALITY, MEN, SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR, SOCIAL PROBLEMS
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 7056
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/3573

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Abstract

This study examined whether social vulnerability is associated with HIV testing among South African men who have sex with men (MSM). A community-based survey was conducted with 300 MSM in Pretoria in 2008. The sample was stratified by age, race and residential status. Social vulnerability was assessed using measures of demographic characteristics, psychosocial determinants and indicators of sexual minority stress. Being black, living in a township and lacking HIV knowledge reduced MSM's likelihood of ever having tested for HIV. Among those who had tested, lower income and not self-identifying as gay reduced mends likelihood of having tested more than once. Lower income and internalized homophobia reduced mends likelihood of having tested recently. Overall, MSM in socially vulnerable positions were less likely to get tested for HIV. Efforts to mitigate the effects of social vulnerability on HIV testing practices are needed in order to encourage regular HIV testing among South African MSM.