Prevalence, correlates and perceptions toward cigarette smoking among male and female in-school adolescents (aged 11-18 years) in South Africa: results from the 2008 GYTS study

SOURCE: Journal of Psychology in Africa
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2012
TITLE AUTHOR(S): K.Peltzer
KEYWORDS: ADOLESCENTS, SMOKING, TOBACCO INDUSTRY, TOBACCO USE
DEPARTMENT: Social Aspects of Public Health (SAPH)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 7444

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and identify correlates of current cigarette use among 8470 school-going adolescents (aged 11 to 18 years) in South Africa. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 2008 in South Africa within the framework of the Global Youth Tobacco Survey. Overall prevalence of current cigarette smoking was 16.5%. Significantly, more male students (22.8%) than female students (10.5%) were current smokers (p < 0.001). Among boys and girls, cigarette smoking was positively associated with (a) being male, (b) parental and/or peer smoking, and (c) the perception of risks. Among girls, cigarette smoking was positively associated with attitudes variables (i.e., having more friends among girls, attractiveness among boys and weight change) and various higher exposures to smoking advertising and promotion activities. However, anti-smoking advertising and community and family education were positively associated with current smoking, while only having school or community special groups or classes for students who want to stop smoking was protective of smoking. Cigarette smoking and other tobacco use is a significant public health problem in South Africa. Public health efforts aimed to prevent adolescent cigarette/tobacco use should incorporate knowledge on the associated factors related to smoking.