Adolescence

SOURCE: Child and adolescent development: a South African socio-cultural perspective
OUTPUT TYPE: Chapter in Monograph
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2012
TITLE AUTHOR(S): L.Wild, S.Swartz
SOURCE EDITOR(S): J.Hardman
KEYWORDS: ADOLESCENTS, YOUTH
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 7539
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/3147

If you would like to obtain a copy of this Research Output, please contact Hanlie Baudin at researchoutputs@hsrc.ac.za.

Abstract

From a developmental perspective, adolescence is both an exciting and a challenging time. Physically, adolescents' bodies are maturing. Cognitively, they start to think about the world in new ways. Socially, changing relationships with families and peers play a central role in shaping their experiences. In Western societies, developmental tasks of the adolescent period include the following: * Making a successful transition to high school * Learning academic skills that are needed for higher education or work * Achieving psychological autonomy * Forming close friendships with those of the same and opposite sex * Developing a sense of identity However, expectations of adolescents are shaped by culture, and by historical and political events. The experience of adolescence, how long it lasts, and its impacts on later development and well-being are influenced by how a particular society thinks about young people, by what demands and pressure it places on them, and by what rights and opportunities it provides them with as they make their journey into adulthood.