Multilingual education policy in South Africa constrained by theoretical and historical disconnections

SOURCE: Annual Review of Applied Linguistics
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2013
TITLE AUTHOR(S): K.Heugh
KEYWORDS: EDUCATION, EDUCATION POLICY, LANGUAGE RIGHTS, MULTILINGUALISM
DEPARTMENT: Inclusive Economic Development (IED)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 8175
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/2474

If you would like to obtain a copy of this Research Output, please contact Hanlie Baudin at researchoutputs@hsrc.ac.za.

Abstract

Multilingual education policy has been a controversial affair in South Africa, especially over the last 60 years. Recent research conducted by government-led and independent agencies shows declining student achievement within an education system that employs 11 home languages for education in the first three grades of primary school, followed by a transitions to English medium for the majority of speakers of African languages. Research that focuses on the linguistic practices of students in urban settings suggests that there is a disjuncture between the construction of multilingualism within contemporary education policy and the multilingual reality of students.