Oral health behaviour and social and health factors in university students from 26 low, middle and high income countries

SOURCE: Int Environmental Research and Public Health
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2014
TITLE AUTHOR(S): K.Peltzer, S.Pengpid
KEYWORDS: DENTAL CARE, LOW INCOME POPULATION, RISK BEHAVIOUR, UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
DEPARTMENT: Human and Social Capabilities (HSC)
Intranet: HSRC Library: shelf number 8533
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/2051
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11910/2051

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Abstract

Poor oral health is still a major burden for populations throughout the world, particularly in developing countries. The aim of this study was investigate oral health behaviour (tooth brushing and dental attendance) and associated factors in low, middle and high income countries. Using anonymous questionnaires, data were collected from 19,560 undergraduate university students (mean age 20.8, SD = 2.8) from 27 universities in 26 countries across Asia, Africa and the Americas. Results indicate that 67.2% of students reported to brush their teeth twice or more times a day, 28.8% about once a day and 4.0% never. Regarding dental check-up visit, 16.3% reported twice a year, 25.6% once a year, 33.9% rarely and 24.3% never. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, being a male, coming from a wealthy or quite well off family background, living in low income or lower middle income, weak beliefs in the importance of regular tooth brushing, depression and PTSD symptoms, tobacco use and frequent gambling, low physical activity, and low daily meal and snacks frequency were associated with inadequate tooth brushing (