Alcohol expectancies and inhibition conflict as moderators of the alcohol-unprotected sex relationship: event-level findings from a daily diary study among individuals living with HIV in Cape Town, South Africa

SOURCE: AIDS and Behavior
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2016
TITLE AUTHOR(S): S.M.Kiene, L.C.Simbayi, A.Abrams, A.Cloete
KEYWORDS: ALCOHOL ABUSE, CAPE TOWN, HIV/AIDS, RISK BEHAVIOUR
DEPARTMENT: Human and Social Capabilities (HSC)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 9122
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/9544

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Abstract

Literature from sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere supports a global association between alcohol and HIV risk. However, more rigorous studies using multiple event-level methods find mixed support for this association, suggesting the importance of examining potential moderators of this relationship. The present study explores the assumptions of alcohol expectancy theory and alcohol myopia theory as possible moderators that help elucidate the circumstances under which alcohol may affect individuals' ability to use a condom. Participants were 82 individuals (58 women, 24 men) living with HIV who completed daily phone interviews for 42 days which assessed daily sexual behavior and alcohol consumption. Logistic generalized estimating equation models were used to examine the potential moderating effects of inhibition conflict and sex-related alcohol outcome expectancies. The data provided some support for both theories and in some cases the moderation effects were stronger when both partners consumed alcohol.