The socioeconomics of livestock keeping in two South African communities: a black man's bank

OUTPUT TYPE: Monograph (Book)
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2016
TITLE AUTHOR(S): V.Reddy, S.Goga, F.Timol, S.Molefi
KEYWORDS: AGRICULTURE, FARMERS, FOOD SECURITY, LAND REFORM, LIVESTOCK, RURAL COMMUNITIES, RURAL COMMUNITIES
DEPARTMENT: Human and Social Development (HSD)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 9274

If you would like to obtain a copy of this Research Output, please contact Hanlie Baudin at researchoutputs@hsrc.ac.za.

Abstract

The South African government has prioritized a reduction of poverty and increased food security in rural parts of South Africa through agrarian transformation. As the bearers and beneficiaries of rural development initiatives, smallholder farmers, including those keeping livestock, loom large in this arena. Likewise, on international development agendas steered by bodies such as the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization), smallholders are prioritized as the engines of national economies. This book, based on a pilot study of two livestock keeping communities along the Mpumalanga-Limpopo border, explores smallholder households in order to paint a picture of the challenges faced by smallholder livestock farmers, the practices and knowledge of primary animal healthcare (PAHC) among these farmers, relationships between the state and the smallholders, gendered issues, and the relationship between poor socioeconomic conditions and the keeping of livestock. This book opens up a variety of research and policy questions that encourage further exploration and study.