Prevalence of prenatal depression and associated factors among HIV-positive women in primary care in Mpumalanga province, South Africa

SOURCE: Sahara J: Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2016
TITLE AUTHOR(S): K.Peltzer, V.J.Rodriguez, D.Jones
KEYWORDS: HIV/AIDS, MPUMALANGA PROVINCE, PREGNANCY, PRIMARY HEALTH CARE, WOMEN
DEPARTMENT: Human and Social Capabilities (HSC)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 9284
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/9905

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Abstract

This study aimed to assess the prevalence of depressed symptoms and associated factors in prenatal HIV-positive women in primary care facilities in rural South Africa. In a cross-sectional study, 663 HIV-positive prenatal women in 12 community health centres in Mpumalanga province, South Africa, were recruited by systematic sampling (every consecutive patient after HIV post-test counselling). Results indicate that overall, 48.7% [95% CI: 44.8, 52.6] of women during the prenatal period reported depressed mood, not being employed, unplanned pregnancy, not having an HIV-positive child, poor antiretroviral therapy adherence, non-condom use at last sex, and intimate partner violence were associated with depressive symptoms. Potential risk factors among HIV-infected prenatal women were identified which could be utilized in interventions. Routine screening for depression may be integrated into prenatal care settings.