Intimate partner violence among HIV positive pregnant women in South Africa

SOURCE: Journal of Psychology in Africa
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2016
TITLE AUTHOR(S): G.Matseke, V.J.Rodriguez, K.Peltzer, D.Jones
KEYWORDS: HIV/AIDS, PARTNER VIOLENCE, PREGNANCY, RISK BEHAVIOUR, WOMEN
DEPARTMENT: Social Aspects of Public Health (SAPH)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 9286

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Abstract

The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) and associated factors among pregnant HIV-infected women in primary health care facilities in Nkangala and Gert Sibande districts, Mpumalanga, South Africa. Participants were 673 women who were, on average, 28.39 - 5.73 years old. Data were collected through Audio Computer Assisted Self Interview (ACASI), and analysed using the IBM Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Overall, 56.3% reported having experienced either psychological or physical IPV, and 19.6% reported physical IPV. In logistic multivariable regression analyses, higher levels of depressive symptoms and greater perceived stigma were associated with combined physical and psychological IPV. Psychological IPV and physical IPV were also individually associated with greater perceived stigma and higher levels of depressive symptoms. The design and implementation of evidence-informed interventions that can empower and protect HIV-infected pregnant women from IPV is essential to managing their health-related quality of life.