Community member perceptions of influences on teenage pregnancies

SOURCE: Journal of Psychology in Africa
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2016
TITLE AUTHOR(S): N.Phaswana-Mafuya, C.Tabane, A.Davids
KEYWORDS: HIV/AIDS, SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR, TEENAGE PREGNANCY
DEPARTMENT: Social Aspects of Public Health (SAPH)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 9304

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Abstract

This exploratory qualitative study aimed to provide insight into the factors contributing to the high prevalence rate of teenage pregnancy in South African communities. Focus group were conducted with 193 community members (females = 44.6%; adults = 50.8%, teenagers/youth = 44.0%) and followed by thematic content analysis to interpret the data. Several overarching themes regarding the increasingly common occurrence of teenage pregnancy emerged from the data. These included: the increased acceptability of teenage pregnancy to families and communities for economic and material gain; the influence of social pressure; and the lack of sexual knowledge and provision of sex education. Community members perceived teenage pregnancy as an increasingly common occurrence in their communities. Community members perceived teenage pregnancy to be driven by multiple factors and to require holistic interventions at the individual, family and community level.