Religiosity and health risk behaviour among university students in 26 low, middle and high income countries

SOURCE: Journal of Religion and Health
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2016
TITLE AUTHOR(S): K.Peltzer, S.Pengpid, O.Amuleru-Marshall, P.Mufune, A.A.Zeid
KEYWORDS: HEALTH, RELIGION, RISK BEHAVIOUR, UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
DEPARTMENT: Social Aspects of Public Health (SAPH)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 9306

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess religiosity and health risk behaviours among university students from 26 low, middle and high income countries. Using anonymous questionnaires, data were collected from 20,222 undergraduate university students (mean age 20.8, SD = 2. 8) from 27 universities in 26 countries across Asia, Africa and the Americas. Among all students, 41.1 % engaged at least once a week in organized religious activity, 35.8 % practised a non-organized religious activity daily or more than once daily, and more or less two-thirds of the students agreed to the three different statements on intrinsic of subjective religiosity. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, higher reported involvement in organized religious activity was associated with addictive, injury, sexual and oral health risk behaviour, while lower reported involvement in organized religious activity was associated with physical inactivity and oral health risk behaviour. Lower reported involvement in non-organized religious activity was associated with addictive, nutrition risk, injury, sexual and oral health risk behaviour, while higher reported involvement in non-organized religious activity was associated with physical inactivity.