Gender power inequalities in the context of HIV/AIDS among South African Indians in an urban setting in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

SOURCE: BOAJ HIV
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2016
TITLE AUTHOR(S): D.Naidoo, M.Taylor, M.L.H.Mabaso
KEYWORDS: GENDER EQUALITY, HIV/AIDS, INDIANS, INEQUALITY, KWAZULU-NATAL
DEPARTMENT: Human and Social Capabilities (HSC)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 9492
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/10401
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11910/10401

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Abstract

A lot of studies on gender power dynamics in relation to HIV in South Africa focus on the high risk African Black population, and little attention has been given to the minority groups. Similar to other communities in the country the HIV/AIDS has had a devastating effect Indian communities and impoverished families. There is also evidence that male dominance among South African Indians encompasses every aspect of women's lives including family, social and religion, and influences their ability to be assertive and to negotiate safe sex which makes them more vulnerable to HIV/ AIDS. It was from this point that we set out to research this largely unexplored study topic, in order to gain insight and understanding of gender-power inequalities underpinnings in the Indian community residing in urban setting in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Thirty two in-depth interviews and three focus group discussions were conducted among Indian women with local community members. Interviews were audio recorded, and transcripts were coded and analyzed using ATLAS.ti. Findings revealed that gender power relations were major social factors contributing to the growth of HIV/AIDS in this population. Gender inequalities make women more susceptible to contracting HIV, with culture playing a role in placing women in high risk situations.