Born (un)free: the construction of citizenship of South Africa

SOURCE: Representation
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2017
TITLE AUTHOR(S): J.Steyn Kotze, G.Prevost
KEYWORDS: CITIZENSHIP, INEQUALITY, POST APARTHEID SOUTH AFRICA, UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
DEPARTMENT: Democracy, Governance and Service Delivery (DGSD)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 9814
HANDLE: 20.500.11910/10979

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Abstract

South Africa is in the midst of a mass transformation project. This project aims to transform society to an inclusive and united polity based on the principles of non-racialism, equality and diversity. This project, underpinned by the political agenda of the National Democratic Revolution, however has not been easy. At the dawn of democracy, South African society was deeply divided socially, politically and economically along racial lines. The transformation project therefore necessitated all-encompassing political, social and economic change. Politically South Africa is a multiracial, politically inclusive and democratic society. However, substantive progress on reducing racialised inequality and poverty has been lacking, which severely undermines a sense of national identity and national identity construction independent of race. It is in this context that this paper presents findings from an empirical survey conducted among university students in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, on their perception of race relations and quality of life as the first generation to have grown up exclusively under ANC rule and its stated commitment of non-racialism.