Parental involvement and health risk behaviours among school-going adolescents in six African countries

SOURCE: Journal of Psychology in Africa
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2018
TITLE AUTHOR(S): S.Pengpid, K.Peltzer
KEYWORDS: AFRICA, HEALTH, PARENTHOOD, RISK BEHAVIOUR
DEPARTMENT: Social Aspects of Public Health (SAPH)
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 10428

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the association between parental involvement (support and monitoring) and health risk behaviours among adolescents in six African countries. Data were from the cross-sectional Global School-Based Student Health Survey (GSHS) which sampled a total of 16 587 adolescents (mean age 14.6 years, SD = 1.6) from 2009 to 2013. In multivariable regression analyses, adjusted for relevant variables, higher levels of parental involvement were negatively associated with substance use (smoking, other tobacco use, drunkenness and illicit drug use) and violence (being bullied, in a physical fight), injury and truancy. Only high-level parental involvement was associated with use of contraception at most recent sex. Interventions for reducing various health risk behaviours should consider the positive impact of parental involvement