Violence exposure in South African adolescents: differential and cumulative effects on psychological functioning

SOURCE: Journal of Interpersonal Violence
OUTPUT TYPE: Journal Article
PUBLICATION YEAR: 2018
TITLE AUTHOR(S): X.Sui, K.Massar, L.T.E.Kessels, P.S.Reddy, R.A.C.Ruiter, K.Sanders-Phillips
KEYWORDS: ADOLESCENTS, CRIME VICTIMS, PSYCHOLOGICAL PROBLEMS, VIOLENCE
Print: HSRC Library: shelf number 10476

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Abstract

This study examined the associations between different types of violence victimization and psychological functioning in South African adolescents. Both differential and cumulative effects of violence were investigated. A multi-ethnic (Black, White, people of mixed heritage, and people of Indian/Asian descent) sample of adolescents in secondary schools in the Western Cape Province (N = 1,574; boys = 46.5%, girls = 53.5%; Mage = 16 years) completed a survey on their experiences of exposure to violence (across different contexts and polyvictimization) and their levels of hopelessness, anxiety, depression, perceived stress, and suicidal ideation. The results showed that indirect and direct victimization in the community, and indirect political victimization were consistent predictors for adverse psychological functioning, whereas victimization in home and school contexts did not emerge to be significant.