New HSRC Publications

Trade Unions & Party Politics Labour movements in Africa

 

 

Soft cover
416pp
ISBN: 978-07969-2336-3
R250.00
2010
 

Trade Unions & Party Politics Movements in Africa was awarded the Book of the Year Award 2010 by The International Labour History Association (ILHA).

The ILHA had not issued any book awards in 2007, 2008 and 2009, which makes this book a highly recognised scholarly work amongst labour scholars.

This volume looks at the way in which trade unions engage with political parties,either by being part of them, taking the lead in their formation, or refusing to join party politics altogether.

Against a backdrop in which it is difficult to separate workplace matters and wider national development, often the aim is to extend the interests of workers into a rights-based agenda that makes civil and political liberties more broadly accessible.

But how are African trade unions engaging with the political parties that can facilitate such change – and are they doing it successfully? By examining the experiences of trade unions in seven African countries, this volume seeks to explore these questions, and open up space for further research.

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THE UNIVERSITY IN DEVELOPMENT: Case Studies of Use-Oriented Research


 

Soft cover
400pp
ISBN 978-0-7969-2347-9
Peer-reviewed book
R450

A seminal study, The University in Development explores how the university is indeed ‘in development’: pursuing a new ‘third’ mission of external societal development (alongside its two existing missions of teaching and research), and experiencing a major internal revolution as this impacts on its structural organisation.

Already prevalent in many institutions internationally, this third academic mission has begun to pose troubling challenges to existing academic research cultures and systems in South Africa

The book is structured in three parts. While the first considers case studies of this academic transformation globally, the second part homes in on new research centres at Western Cape universities to examine the combination of creativity and disruption arising as this third academic mission evolves in South Africa.

Part three argues that new visions, concepts and policies of research are needed if our universities are to unlock their ‘knowledges’ for societal development, with greater social justice not only for industry but also for civil society.

The University in Development will be of interest to scholars in the fields of higher education, innovation studies and the sociology of knowledge, and is of critical relevance to policy-makers.

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